3 x 100m turbines at Chapman's Howe Wind Farm

at

Hartburn Farm, Kirkcudbright

 

Please, we need as many genuine objections as possible as we are aware that there is a support 'campaign' ongoing.  Please pass this on to as many people as you can and show the developers and our councillors that we care about the landscape of D & G.

 

CH_panorama_1_600px

Proposed 3 x 100m turbines near Hartburn Farm, Kirkcudbright

Click on the photo to see a larger image.

 

The 2 x 20m turbines on site will be removed if Chapman's Howe is approved.  They are barely visible to the left but show the difference in size!  This is an approximation of what the development will look like.

 

The site lies off the B727 (National Cycle Route 7) which is the Gelston to Kirkcudbright road, between Nether Linkins and Whinnieliggate and is adjacent to the proposed Barcloy Hill development.

 

The site is not ‘up in the hills’ and away from people as there are 26 properties within 2km.

 

The development would be located in a very complex landscape which is unique in Dumfries and Galloway.  On the cusp of coastal granite uplands and peninsula landscape character types, turbines of this height would dominate the iconic ridgeline of Screel, Bengairn/Barcloy contravening local policy.

 

Dumfries & Galloway Council's responsibility is to ensure a balance between turbine development and the amenity value of local landscapes. These landscape types have been assessed for local Council policy as NOT being suitable for turbines over 50 – 55m to tip.  If these turbines (or any turbines over 55m) are approved it will set a precedent for this area.  This would render the council’s latest planning policy ineffective for any other turbine developments  – wasting a great deal of public money. More importantly there would be no effective means of protecting valuable local landscapes against the industrialising effects of very big turbine development.

 

 

Barcloy Ridge

 

The Barcloy Ridge – photo taken from B727 near Sypland.  Note the 80m mast to the right that towers above the Barcloy ridge line.  The foreground is the Chapman's Howe site and the turbines would be approximately the same tip height as the mast tip!

Barcloy mast


TW312 firmly believes that this development is inappropriate for the location and is contrary to Council poilcy.


 

Below are 2 specimen objection letters that you may copy and paste into your own document

 

It is better to rewrite the objection in your own words but we know people don’t always have time.  Every objection submitted is important.

 

If more than one person from your household wants to object please send an objection in from each person.  One objection letter signed by several people still only counts as a single objection!

 

Remember to include your name, address and date for validity (posted objections must also be signed)

Email to: PlanningRepresentations@dumgal.gov.uk

 

Or post to:       

Head of Planning and Building Standards

Dumfries and Galloway Council

Kirkbank

English Street

Dumfries

DG1 2HS

 

Objections must be submitted by 5pm Thursday 15th August 2013

 

If you object via email or letter and don't intend to use  one of the objection cards received through your letterbox, please pass the card onto someone you think may be prepared to object.

 

Thank you!

 


[version1]

 

[Address]

 

[Date]

 

Head of Planning and Building Standards

Dumfries and Galloway Council

Kirkbank

English Street

Dumfries

DG1 2HS

 

Dear Planning Officer,

 

Planning Application    13/P/2/0189

Erection of 3 x 100m wind turbines and associated infrastructure

at Chapman's Howe, Hartburn Farm, Kirkcudbright

 

I object to this application on the following grounds:-

 

Approval of this scheme would set a precedent and open the area to further large scale turbines.

 

The proposed size of turbine is contrary to the guidance detailed in the Dumfries and Galloway Wind Farm Landscape Capacity Study, which identifies turbines of 50-55m to tip as being more appropriate for this site.

 

The height of these turbines will diminish the scale of the landmark hills and ridge line of Screel, Bengairn and Barcloy. Scottish Natural Heritage advises turbines should not be more than one third of the height of key landmarks (such as these coastal granite hills).

 

The turbines would be too close to several properties but one in particular will experience an over-bearing presence with all 3 turbines located within 750m.  Local people face a potential adverse impact on their quality of life and property values.  Emerging evidence indicates that wind turbines can impact indirectly on health due to stress and annoyance from noise, which are known to cause problems such as disrupted sleep, tinnitus, loss of concentration and cardiovascular problems.

 

Excessive amounts of construction traffic and abnormal loads will travel through Gelston and along minor roads over a six month period.

 

The site supports a variety of wildlife which could suffer through loss of foraging/disturbance of habitat and many wintering birds pass through the site on their way to and from feeding grounds.

 

There will be a significant adverse impact on the setting of archaeological features such as Kirkbride Settlement and Dungarry Fort.

 

This proposal breaches SPP 127, 187 and local policies S21, E3, E6, GP7, GP24, D36 and the IPP.

 

I do not believe the benefits of this development will outweigh the negative impacts and hope you refuse this application.

 

Yours faithfully,

 

[Name & Signature]

 


[Version 2 – more detailed]

 

[Address]

 

[Date]

 

Head of Planning and Building Standards

Dumfries and Galloway Council

Kirkbank

English Street

Dumfries

DG1 2HS

 

Dear Planning Officer,

 

Planning Application    13/P/2/0189

Erection of 3 x 100m wind turbines and associated infrastructure

at Chapman's Howe, Hartburn Farm, Kirkcudbright

 

I object to this application on the following grounds:-

 

Setting a precedent

 

Approval of this scheme would set a precedent and open the area to further large scale turbines which would prove difficult to stop.  SNH have raised concerns in their scoping response for the adjacent Barcloy Hill “that permitting the use of large turbines in this location would set a precedent for their widespread use in this area”.

 

Size of turbines

 

The site sits on the boundaries of 2 landscape character types (peninsula and coastal granite uplands).  The Dumfries and Galloway Wind Farm Landscape Capacity Study (LCS) indicates that neither landscape type is suitable for turbines of this size by stating that:-

 

“There is no scope for the larger typologies to be located within the Dundrennan peninsula without significant adverse effects occurring on a number of key sensitivity criteria.”

 

“There is no scope for the large typology to be located within the Bengairn unit of the Coastal Granite Uplands without significant adverse effects occurring across a wide range of sensitivities.”

 

The Landscape Capacity Study classification for Coastal Granite Uplands, identifies turbines at the lower end of medium typology (50-55m to tip) as being more appropriate for this site.

 

“Scale and openness:-   there may be some limited opportunity to locate turbines towards the lower height band of this typology (and limited numbers of turbines) to avoid dominating the vertical scale of key hills.”

 

“Landform and shape:-   There may be some limited scope to locate lower (height) turbines on slacker lower hill slopes and less complex undulating moorland in the north-west and west of this unit to minimise effects on adjacent more dramatic rugged hills”.

 

“Landscape context:-   there may be some increased scope to locate turbines towards the lower height band of this typology in areas where the landmark hills are less pronounced”

 

"Landscape values:-   This typology may also affect the setting of the landmark hills if located in undesignated parts of this landscape unit of the Coastal Granite Uplands."

 

However, the applicant fails to make a convincing case that the locality is appropriate for 100m turbines to tip.  They completely fail to address the issue of the scale of the turbines in relation to the height of the landmark hills of Bengairn, Barcloy and Suie Hill.

 

Guidance from SNH 2009, states that wind farms of good design are typically “Of minor vertical scale in relation to the key features of the landscape (typically less than one third)”

 

This proposal is for  turbines to be  sited approximately 135m below the Barcloy ridgeline. SNH's guidance (above) would mean limiting the height of  turbines to no more than 50m.  This guidance backs the advice in the LCS, which is further supported by the fact that, to date, there are no approved turbines over 55m in the area with several proposals ranging from 74m to 130m being refused by the council and/or the Scottish Government.

 

Turbines of 100m to tip will have the effect of diminishing the scale of this iconic ridge and in many views the turbines will be visible on the skyline.  Views to and from these hills will be disrupted by the moving blades.

 

The landscape around the site is unique and complex and the introduction of large industrial generators will detract from these rare, special qualities as they would appear out of scale with the surrounding landscape and the small landscape features of gorse, hedgerows and mature trees. The applicant tries to down-grade the landscape sensitivity of the site and this tactic should not be entertained.

 

 

Impacts on National Scenic Area (NSA) and Regional Scenic Area (RSA)

 

There is a tendency for wind developers to devalue the inland setting of the coastal granite uplands.  The Screel/Bengairn/Barcloy ridge performs an important function as the background setting for Castle Douglas and for views across the wider area.

 

The LCS identifies that uninterrupted views to and from Bengairn are important.  This does not only mean out to the coastal views but as a 360 ° experience.  The piecemeal erosion of parts of the NSA and RSA should not be tolerated.  At just over 3km distance from Bengairn these turbines will introduce large, vertical, moving, man made structures which will detract significantly from the vistas.

 

The RSA is just 400m away and actually extends towards the site beyond the NSA boundary.  This whole area is worthy of National Park status and the small scale of our NSA’s and RSA’s should be fiercely protected.

 

 

Impacts on Residential Amenity

       

The turbines would be far too close to nearby properties with all 3 turbines ranging from approximately 650 – 750m for one property.  This would have an overbearing effect on the residents.  Local people face a reduction in their quality of life and property values due to significant visual impact and/or noise.

 

The developer gives assurances that the permitted noise levels will be met but adhering to these levels does not guarantee that local people won’t suffer noise problems.  Guidance (ETSU-R-97) was written in 1996 at a time when turbines were half the height planned for Chapman’s Howe and is considered by many acousticians to be outdated and unfit for purpose.

 

If Barcloy Hill is approved, the applicant requests that the permitted noise levels be raised from 35 dB during the daytime to 37.5dB.  This should not be allowed – it is evident that trying to cram too many turbines in-between properties is an identied problem so why should local residents suffer higher noise levels?

 

Emerging evidence indicates that wind turbines can impact indirectly on health due to stress and annoyance, which are known to cause problems such as disrupted sleep, tinnitus, loss of concentration and cardiovascular problems.

 

In view of this, the ‘Precautionary Principle’ should be invoked and setback distances of 2km enforced between properties and turbines.

 

 

Other issues

 

Excessive amounts of construction traffic and abnormal loads will travel through Gelston and along minor roads over a six month period.  Local property owners are concerned about structural damage heavy traffic could cause to their roadside dwellings

 

The site supports a variety of wildlife which could suffer through loss of foraging/disturbance of habitat and many wintering birds pass through the site on their way to and from feeding grounds.  The numbers of over-wintering birds quoted are low compared to the numbers witnessed by locals in the area.  One of the problems with the bird surveys is that the bird surveyors do not attain a true picture of the large numbers of over-wintering birds that fly over the site on days when they are not present.

 

There will be a significant adverse impact on the setting of archaeological features such as Kirkbride Settlement and Dungarry Fort.

 

The Chapman's Howe Wind Farm would in effect be adjacent to the Barcloy Hill 5 x 115 metre wind turbine development for which the application has been submitted but not yet decided.  If Barcloy were consented, this development would have a cumulative negative impact due to the differing heights of turbines and rotational speeds of the blades which would make for a confusing picture and would ‘clutter’ the locality.  The impact on the landscape character would be significant and adverse and the requested increase in permitted noise levels to 37.5dB should not be allowed for what in effect would be an 8 turbine wind farm.

 

The applicant admits in their application that this development will bring little economic benefit to the area, however, it will have long term economic consequences for households as the ‘subsidies’ gained by the development are levied via consumers’ electricity bills for the 25-year operational life of the wind farm.

 

This proposal breaches SPP 127, 187 and local policies S21, E3, E6, GP7, GP24, D36 and the IPP

 

I do not believe the benefits of this development will outweigh the negative impacts and urge you you refuse this application.

 

Yours faithfully,

 

[Name & Signature]

 


Go to the main page

Comments are closed.

STOP PRESS

Post Categories

Post Archives