Search Results for: larg

Credit:     Simon Johnson     Scottish Political Editor     The Telegraph     (13/11/2012)

 

SNP minsters have waved through more than four out of five of the largest and most controversial planning applications for wind farms, according to official figures just published.

 

Since the Nationalists took power five years ago, 29 out of the 35 major developments referred to them for a final decision have been approved.

 

The Conservatives, who published the figures, said ministers were sending a message to wind farm companies saying: “Come straight to us and you have an 80 per cent chance of success”.

 

Clyde wind farm by Olive Repton

 

 

Banks Renewables have submitted Further Environmental Information on their proposed changes to the Knockendurrick development near Twynholm.  Documents can now be viewed on the council website and comments submitted until 5pm on Thursday 29th June 2017.

 

Although Banks have reduced the height of the turbines from 7 x 132m turbines to 6 x 115m and 1 x 100m to tip, the development would still have significant landscape and visual impacts.

 

The Dumfries and Galloway Wind Farm Landscape Capacity Study, which states that “There is no scope for siting the large (>80m)  typology (turbines) within this landscape due to the scale of these foothills and their likely  prominence from adjacent sensitive landscapes", is quite clear that this development is in the wrong location. 

 

Below is an approximation of how the proposal could look…..

 

A new website has been set up called Say No to Knockendurrick – please Click here for more information

 

The refusal of the California, Mayfield, Barcloy Hill and Chapman's Howe developments in recent years strongly supports local policies.  If Knockendurrick were approved it would be particularly visible across large areas to the south, west and east which is the heart of D & G's main tourist area and it would significantly weaken local policies. 

 

We need as many people as possible to object individually to this scheme as Banks have been very active collecting support and many people have no idea exactly what they are supporting or how the proposal is contrary to local planning policies.

 

Please help us to protect our landscapes and tourism industry, by objecting before 5pm on Thursday 29th June and passing the message on to as many people as you can and asking them to object too.

 

Click HERE for a specimen objection letter created for Knockendurrick. You can add or delete text as you like! Just insert your address, the date and then your name at the end. Remember if two or more people sign the same objection it will only count as one so please sign and send in individually.

 

 

We have been a little late in reporting this important news – perhaps too busy celebrating. However, finally, after 4 missed decision target dates we know the outcome of the Barcloy Hill wind farm appeal.

 

It's good news for local residents with the Reporter dismissing the appeal.

 

The Reporter supported the council's and SNH's assessments and guidance from the Dumfries and Galloway Wind Farm Landscape Capacity Study (DGWLCS), including that:-

 

  • the local landscape is medium in scale with some small scale features which do not have the capacity to absorb large turbines.  This was in contrast to the developer's assertion that the landscape scale was medium-large.

  • Scottish Natural Heritage's (SNH) guidance on siting wind farms, which identifies turbines should be of minor vertical scale in relation to key landscape features, (ideally no more than one third the height) should be considered. She highlighted how the turbines would be almost the same height as the ridge which would have the effect of "minimising the height of the ridge" and "make it look smaller".

 

  • the "development would have a detrimental impact on Bengairn both in terms of how it would be viewed from outwith the NSA and also on the views available from its summit." thus conflicting with local policy NE1.

 

  • there would be a detrimental impact on the nearby Regional Scenic Area and significant visual impacts for several residents close to the site.

 

  • the Reporter also noted that the developer included no assesment of the impact on resdential amenity in their submission

 

The Reporter did NOT agree with the developer's assessment that the Barcloy ridge was not a particularly prominent feature and highlighted "that the photomontages in the Environmental Statement are not a true representation of the prominence of Barcloy hill as it is seen in real life from various viewpoints."

 

The conclusion was that "the proposed development does not accord overall with the relevant provisions of the development plan and that there are no material considerations which would justify granting planning permission".

Barcloy mast

After 5 years of stress fighting this proposal, there is relief for many in the area. It was the appearance of the intital 80 metre met mast on Barcloy Hill (May 2010) that first alerted local residents to the potential invasion of very large turbines in this scenic area and to the formation of Turbine Watch 312. We will keep going and will continue to actively oppose windfarm proposals wherever, in the OS 312 area, we think they are inappropriate.
 
Thank you to all those who supported us in this campaign!

 

When we express our opposition to the local siting of large turbines it is not uncommon for pro-wind advocates to trot out the hackneyed accusation of 'NIMBY"!

 

Of course anyone who finds themselves directly affected by wind farm proposals will have done a little more research than most and will know about the invasive effects turbines can have on the health and wellbeing of those living nearby. This is not trivial and neither is it a gentile form of aesthetic 'nimbyism'. The validated evidence of harm is growing – and it is, of course, unlikely that you will hear the Scottish Government, wind farm developers, land owners or even local Environmental Health officers talking about it! (Hmmm – why?)

 

If you are interested or concerned you might like to look at this presentation.

 

Stop These Things have developed this really interesting timeline. It sets out a chronology of what the wind industry knew (and when); what the wind industry did in response to this knowledge and how the wind industry is still manouevering  to ensure that this knowledge is marginalised in the interests of minimising opposition to the proliferation of large turbines. Meanwhile it is increasingly apparent that turbines can have significant, negative effects on the health and well-being of people living next door to wind farms. Click here to see the presentation.

 

So when someone wants to accuse you of being a climate change skeptik, a middle class aesthete, a privileged country dweller or a NIMBY – tell them about the validated harmful effects on people who live near wind farms and who are seen as irritants to be overcome by the Government and the industry.

When we express our opposition to the local siting of large turbines it is not uncommon for pro-wind advocates to trot out the hackneyed accusation of 'NIMBY"!

 

Of course anyone who finds themselves directly affected by wind farm proposals will have done a little more research than most and will know about the invasive effects turbines can have on the health and wellbeing of those living nearby. This is not trivial and neither is it a gentile form of aesthetic 'nimbyism'. The validated evidence of harm is growing – and it is, of course, unlikely that you will hear the Scottish Government, wind farm developers, land owners or even local Environmental Health officers talking about it! (Hmmm – why?)

 

If you are interested or concerned you might like to look at this presentation.

 

Stop These Things have developed this really interesting timeline. It sets out a chronology of what the wind industry knew (and when); what the wind industry did in response to this knowledge and how the wind industry is still manouevering  to ensure that this knowledge is marginalised in the interests of minimising opposition to the proliferation of large turbines. Meanwhile it is increasingly apparent that turbines can have significant, negative effects on the health and well-being of people living next door to wind farms. Click here to see the presentation.

 

So when someone wants to accuse you of being a climate change skeptik, a middle class aesthete, a privileged country dweller or a NIMBY – tell them about the validated harmful effects on people who live near wind farms and who are seen as irritants to be overcome by the Government and the industry.

 

The Chapman's Howe Appeal decision finally came through on 12th January and it was great news for everyone who submitted an objection.

 

The Reporter supported the guidance in the Council's Landscape Capacity Study and refused the appeal on grounds of the landscape and visual impact and the significant adverse effect on some local residents.

 

Here are a few of the Reporter's comments:-

 

"Overall, I regard this as a medium scale landscape. I do not agree with the appellant that it should be classed as medium-large."

"The openness of the site itself is contained within a landscape that has many smaller-scale elements, and is set against the backdrop of Barcloy Ridge (264 metres ADD, roughly 140 metres above the site) and the higher hills of Bentudor (274 metres) and Bengairn (391 metres). The proposed 100 metre turbines would appear large in relation to the existing landscape features."

"The visualisation from VP2 shows how they would dwarf the houses and trees in the immediately surrounding area as seen from the south. Viewed from the west, the blade tips at a height of over 210 metres ADD would seem to dominate Barcloy Ridge,"

"I consider that the turbines would become a dominant element in the landscape within 4-5 kilometres of the site. They would appear out of scale with other landscape features including the hills of Barcloy, Bentudor and Bengairn."

"SNH considers that the impact on the view from Bengairn would be adverse and Significant, and that this is of particular concern given the significance of this viewpoint as a landmark feature within the East Stewartry Coast National Scenic Area.  I agree that the proposed development would appreciably diminish the quality of the views from Bengairn and the neighbouring hills".

"These [5] properties are sited at ranges between 634 metres and 890 metres from the nearest turbine. At this proximity, I consider the effect of 100 metre high turbines would be overbearing and would significantly reduce the attractiveness of these properties as places to live."

 

There are plenty of relieved people around the Whinnieliggate/Nether Linkins area today who would like to thank everyone who has supported them over the past two and a half years in this fight! 

smiley

 

Barcloy Hill
 
The Barcloy Hill decision was expected on the 9th January, but no decision was posted.  Instead, a letter asking NATS to clarify their position in relation to an outstanding objection was listed on the website.

 

The target date for a decision was amended to the 6th March 2015.

 

Let us hope, in light of the Chapman's Howe decision, that the outcome is the same.

 

June Newsletter

 

In this month's edition

 

Barcloy Hill – date for decision?

Help protect Cairn Holy

Update on Stewartry developments

News from further afield

Local Development Plan update

Community Windpower go for a record

 

 

 

Barcloy Hill

 

It is looking likely that the Barcloy Hill application for 5 x 115m turbines will be decided at the Planning Application Committee (PAC) meeting on THURSDAY 17th JULY. More details will be sent out once we have definite confirmation.

 

Help protect Cairn Holy

 

Plans for an 80m met mast just over 1km from Cairn Holy have been submitted. In 2012 councillors refused permission for a similar sized mast at Blackmyre Moor close by, on the grounds that it would have "a significant adverse impact on the Galloway Hills Regional Scenic Area".

 

The decision was not contested and plans for a wind farm were dropped with the developer saying "Vattenfall has decided not to pursue a development at this site due to concerns raised over the proximity to several Scheduled Monuments and the potential visual impact in the local area ".

 

The Kirkdale Hill mast will be visible from several Scheduled Monuments including Cairn Holy and across the west to Wigtown and Martyr's Stake.

 

 

Below is an objection you can copy and paste if you wish to help protect the area by objecting.

 

Objections must be submitted by 5pm on Friday 27th June

 

Email to pe.wigtown.planning@dumgal.gov.uk.

 

 

Name

Address

 

 

Date

 

 

Application (14/P/2/0209) for an 80m met mast at Kirkdale Hill, Carsluith

 

 

Dear Planning Officer,

 

I wish to register my objection to the above proposal on the following grounds:-

 

 

  • Adverse visual impact on the Galloway Hills Regional Scenic Area and views from the Western side of Wigtown Bay (including from Martyr's Stake) resulting from an increase in man-made visual clutter and cumulative effect with Cambret Hill Masts and turbines at Kirkmabreck and Larg Hill (erected and consented).

 

  • Adverse visual impact on the setting of Scheduled Monuments (Cairn Holy Chambered Cairns, Bagbie Cairn and Stone Circle, the Standing Stone of Bagbie and Glenquicken Moor Stone Circle) and the Listed Building old Kirkmabreck Kirk.

 

  • A local precedent for refusal of a Met Mast (12/P/2/0017) at adjacent Blackmyre Moor was set in May 2012 on the basis "That the proposed mast would have a significant adverse impact on the Galloway Hills Regional Scenic Area".

 

  • Adverse visual impact on Dark Sky Park if visible aviation lighting fitted.

 

  • Safety Risk of aircraft accident  (MOD  low level flying Tactical Training Area).

 

  • The application offers no economic benefit to Dumfries and Galloway but the approval of this mast will signal the intention of yet another wind farm. This will adversely impact on local properties making them, at best difficult to sell and at worst unsaleable, until a final decision is taken on the pending wind farm, all of which can take several years.

 

I hope you consider my comments and refuse this application.

 

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Name

 

 

 

Update on Stewartry developments

 

 

Chapman's Howe – REG Windpower have contacted the Planning Department to say that if the proposal is not decided by council at the PAC meeting on the 25th June, then they will appeal the application directly to the Scottish Government on the grounds of non-determination within the relevant time limit. Planning have replied to say the application will not be on the agenda for decision on that date and that REG are within their rights to appeal.

 

Knockendurrick – The council's Landscape Architect has submitted his report on the landscape and visual impacts of Banks' proposed 7 x 132m turbines near Twynholm and Gatehouse.

 

His report can be read here (dated 13th May 2014)

 

http://eaccess.dumgal.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=documents&keyVal=_DUMF_DCAPR_103687

 

The recommendations are for an objection to be raised on the significant adverse impact on the Fleet Valley National Scenic Area, the local landscape character, nearby residents and key recreational viewpoints.

 

Mochrum Fell – 11 x 126.5m turbines. Currently NATS and MoD have lodged objections to the plans. The council's Landscape Architect has recommended objection on grounds of landscape and visual impacts, particularly on Loch Ken, and cumulative impacts with Blackcraig.

 

SNH have also raised serious concerns on cumulative impacts and the effects on Loch Ken.

 

 

High Barcaple – The 1 x 62m turbine near Ringford was granted planning permission by the Scottish Government Reporter who overturned the council's original refusal. Sadly, this decision permits the tallest turbine in the area now despite the Landscape Capacity Study indicating that turbines of this size in drumlin pastures are unsuitable.

 

Littleton Farm have applied for 3 x 45m turbines but the application will only see a blade length change on the towers that currently operate. It also means the third turbine will now be constructed as grid connection issues appear to have been solved. No decision has been made yet.

 

Culdoach Farm, Tongland – an application for 2 x 48.5m to tip turbines has been submitted and is now closed for comment.

 

Land south of Mollance Farm – the site is where the "Woodlands for sale" sign is on the A75 for those of you who know the locality. The proposal is for a 1 x 44.5m turbine right next to the River Dee. If any of you took a picture of this area earlier this year when the Dee flooded we'd love to see it! No decision has been made but the application is closed for comment.

 

Meikle Culloch – 2 x 35m turbines – the proposal was due for decision at the Planning Application Committee meeting last month. However, councilors agreed to go on a site visit to assess the potential impacts.

 

Knockower Community Wind Farm, Loch Doon (14/E/2/0008) – Sorry, no prizes for those who worked out from the title that the scoping applicants are Community Windpower Ltd! The site is located approximately 1.1km north-east of Loch Doon Castle for up to 16 x 145m turbines. Loch Doon itself is a Site of Scientific Interest (SSI) for Arctic Charr.

 

 

News from further afield

 

 

Newfield Wind Farm, which was for 21 turbines totaling 63MW, has been refused by the Scottish Government on grounds of visual, landscape and cumulative impacts.

 

Solwaybank has been taken to appeal for 15 turbines.

 

Harestanes Ext – D & G council have decided to raise an objection to the proposed additional 7 turbine extension to the 57 currently being constructed.

 

Millriggs Farm, Lockerbie have applied for a scoping opinion for a single 127m turbine.

 

 

Gass Farm – Glenluce

 

An application for a 9 turbine wind farm will be submitted in approximately 12 weeks time as a Pre-Application Notice has been served.

 

The site is close to Artfield Fell, Artfield Fell ext, Carscreugh (all of which are operational) Glenchamber (about to be constructed) and Airies (approved).

 

We will let you know when this application is open for comment.

 

Local Development Plan

 

Dumfries and Galloway council had submitted their draft Local Development Plan to the Scottish Government Reporters for examination. A number of modifications have been 'suggested' by the Reporters.  Please note, when the Reporters say "suggestions" they really mean "recommendations (which are binding on the Council)".

 

The Council’s Planners had  seemingly protected areas of high and medium landscape sensitivity by not including them in ‘Areas of Search’.  The Reporters, however, have suggested that the Planners should revise this approach in line with Scottish Planning Policy which seems to indicate that areas of high and medium landscape sensitivity should be included in ‘Areas of Search’.

 

There are other changes but the full implications are not understood presently and we'll try to find out what they mean.

 

And finally….

 

Community Windpower Ltd have set a new record for D & G by submitting a scoping application (14/E/3/0007) for up to 20 X 160m turbines. It will be an extension to their Sanqhuar Community Wind Farm, 9km South of Sanqhuar.

 

Planning Applications Committee Meetings for 2014

Wed  11th June

Wed   25th June

Thurs  17 July

Wed   27th Aug

Wed   24th Sept

Wed   22nd Oct

Wed   26th Nov

Wed   16th Dec

 

 

 

Apologies for the lateness of December’s Newsletter – it has been a very busy couple of months for TW312, so without further ado, let’s update you on the latest developments in the local wind farm world – but not before we have taken this opportunity to wish you a

 

VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR!
 
 


 

Knockendurrick
 
The opportunity to comment on this proposal is now closed.  It was heart-warming to see that 698 people submitted an objection to this application.  Banks’ people though raised 500 letters of support and several people contacted us to say Banks were knocking on doors even up until the last day.  There are still representations awaiting logging and it is likely to be Wednesday before the final numbers will be known.
 
There appears to be a problem with objection cards posted around 6th to the 9th November as we know some seem to be missing.  If people are concerned that their objection hasn't been received by the planning office please let us know at turbinewatch312@gmail.com
 
The objections already listed on the council’s e-planning website can be viewed here

http://eaccess.dumgal.gov.uk/online-applications/applicationDetails.do?activeTab=documents&keyVal=_DUMF_DCAPR_103687
 
The MoD and Historic Scotland have both lodged objections.  Historic Scotland usually only object to a development on ‘national grounds’ and have cited the significant adverse impact on the cairn on Cairntosh Hill.
 


 

Chapman's Howe – 3 x 100m turbines

The MoD has withdrawn their objection to this proposal and the date for decision is 20th Jan 2014.  We suspect that this application will be decided at the Planning Application Committee (PAC) meeting on Wed 29th Jan.
 
High Barcaple  – 1 x 62m turbine

At the PAC meeting on the 11th December, the proposed 62m high turbine at High Barcaple was refused due to landscape impact grounds as the site is located in drumlin pastures.  According to the Landscape Capacity Study drumlins are not suitable (in general) for turbines of more than 35m to tip.  There is presently a 50m mast at High Barcaple which is highly visible around the area.

 

Appeal decisions

Two recent decisions by Scottish Government Reporters have been a bit of a mixed bag.  The Standingstone Farm, Borgue appeal for a 45m turbine to tip was refused as the Reporter found “the proposed development incompatible with its landscape setting and the landscape character of the area.”    This decision once again demonstrated support for local policies but sadly an earlier finding by a different Reporter to grant the Little Sypland appeal for a 1 x74m turbine, seemed at odds with all previous outcomes.
 
Plascow – 3 x 74m turbines

The applicant has agreed an extension for decision until 28th February 2014

 

Barcloy Hill – 5 x 115m turbines

No further news

 


 

New wind farm applications   
 

Two applications have been submitted recently (just in time for the Christmas and New Year period!).
 
Mochrum Fell (13/P/2/0327) for 11 x 126.5m turbines and Auchleand (13/P/1/0366) for 7 x 130m from our old friends Community Windpower Ltd
 
 
Mochrum Fell forms part of the ridgeline which can be seen from many parts of our area and the backdrop to the Ken Valley and Dalry.  The application will be advertised next Thursday (19th) December in the paper meaning the closing date for comment will be Thursday 16th January 2014.  It would appear that objections are already being accepted though.  We do not know the dates for comments for Auchleand yet!

 

A further reminder of these two proposals will be sent out in the New Year as a lot of people will be busy in the run-up to the festive season.

 
Below is a short objection letter for Mochrum Fell that you may copy and paste into your own document
 

It is better to rewrite the objection in your own words but we know people don’t always have time.  Every objection submitted is important

If more than one person from your household wants to object please send the objection in from each separate person.  One objection signed by more than one person still only counts as one!

 

Remember to include your name, address and date for validity (posted objections must also be signed)

Email to PlanningRepresentations@dumgal.gov.uk

Post to     

Head of Planning and Building Standards
Dumfries and Galloway Council
Kirkbank
English Street
Dumfries
DG1 2HS

Objections must be submitted by 5pm Thursday 16th January, 2014

 

 
Address
 

Date
 
Planning Application number 13/P/2/0327
 
Erection of 11 x 126.5m turbines and associated infrastructure at Mochrum Fell, Parton
 
Email   PlanningRepresentations@dumgal.gov.uk
 
 
Dear Planning Officer,
 
 
I OBJECT to the Mochrum Fell Wind Farm for reasons set out below:
 
 

Mochrum Fell wind farm would be prominently sited and highly visible over a large area cluttering the backdrop to Loch Ken and the south and impacting historical assets, designated landscapes, roads, footpaths and viewpoints (Policies E2/3/11, S21).

 

Significant adverse impact on the landscape of the surrounding area due to the height, number and siting of the turbines which will industrialise and change the character of the neighbouring countryside. (IPP & Policies E3, S21, GP7 and 24).

 

19 homes within 2km of the wind farm could suffer potential noise and/or health impacts. (Policies S21, GP24).

 

Excessive & abnormal construction traffic through Crossmichael & Parton, estimated 8,000 HGV movements, between 40 to 90 vehicles per day.  (Policies S21, GP24).

 

Potential adverse impact on the area’s natural heritage, including protected species – goshawks, red kites, great crested newts, 7 bat species. (Policy E6) Impact on established tourism & recreational businesses, tourist routes & trails. (Policy S21).

 
I request that you refuse this application.
 
Yours sincerely
 

Name
 

_________________________________

 

 

Save the Machars
 

We have heard about another campaign group, in Wigtownshire, which is fighting developments over in that area, so please give their website a look and help if you can.

 

www.savethemachars.com
 

_________________________________

 

 

Community Benefits Consultation

 
There is a ‘community benefits consultation’ being run by the Scottish Government which is open for comment until the 17th January 2014.  If anyone would like to comment please go  to  http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2013/11/8279  for further information.
 

_________________________________
 

 

Planning News
 

Planning applications
 
 
13/P/1/0351   Annabaglish 14 x 110m   closed for comments
                                (Newton Stewart/Wigtown way)
 
13/C/3/0024   Harestanes ext 7 x 126.5m  (Section 36)
                                Open for comments until Friday 20th Dec
                                Please contact us for details of where to submit
 
13/C/4/0025  Beck Burn, Longtown   (Solway Moss)  9 x 126m
 
13/C/4/0026   Hallburn Farm, Longtown   6 x 126.5m
 
 
Scoping requests
 
13/E/2/0035   Corlae Byre, Dalry   1 x 22.4m

13/E/2/0036   NW of Kirkland Cottage, Manse Rd, Lochfoot
                                1 x 34.42m
 
 
Approved
 
13/P/2/0252   Torrorie Farm, Kirkbean 1 x 20.35m

 
_________________________________

 

TW312's email address has changed to

turbinewatch312@gmail.com 

 
Visit our FACEBOOK PAGE

 

The Knockenduurrick application is now open for comment and members of TW312 have been reading the Environmental Statement submitted by Banks.

 

Key points:-

 

Banks contend that seven 132m high turbines, planned near Twynholm and the Glengap Forest, are suitable for the proposed location based on the guidance from the Dumfries and Galloway Landscape Assessment of 1998, which acknowledges that the intended site could be suitable for a wind farm.

 

The key point Banks have conveniently ignored though, is that this document refers to turbines of approximately 60m to tip as was usual for that era.  Current guidance in the Dumfries and Galloway Wind Farm Landscape Capacity Study (LCS) is quite clear that this size of turbine is not suitable for the complex landform.

 

Banks also admit that 19% of the Fleet Valley National Scenic Area (NSA) will experience significant adverse effects on the landscape character – but then decide in the big scheme of things that isn't important!

As such, only a small percentage of the NSA (19 % of the total land area) would experience significant adverse effects on landscape character. This leads to the conclusion that the effects would not be significant overall

 

Turbines would be visible from Vennie Hill, Rutherford's Monument, Cardoness Castle, Mossyard, Barstobrick (Neilson's Monument) parts of Kircudbright including some of the Conservation Area, Twynholm, Ringford, Borgue and Gatehouse.

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Approximation of the view from Mossyard if Knockendurrick is builtOur thanks to John Smith for his kind permission to use his stunning photomontages.

 

Banks are asking for the turbines to be able to operate at a higher noise level than is usual for a development of this size.  This is due to the cumulative effect with the operating/consented smaller farm turbines in the area.  There are over 30 properties within 2km and 15 are predicted to experience significant adverse visual effects.

 

We are still reading the ES and will post more information when we can

 

 

TW312 firmly believes that this development is inappropriate for the location.

 

We have provided a specimen objection letter (below) you can copy that includes some key points.

 

It is better to rewrite the objection in your own words but we know people don’t always have time.  Every objection submitted is important

 

If more than one person from your household wants to object please send the objection in from each separate person.  One objection signed by more than one person still only counts as one!

 

Remember to include your name, address and date, for validity (posted objections must also be signed)

 

Email to

PlanningRepresentations@dumgal.gov.uk

 

Post to 

Head of Planning and Building Standards

Dumfries and Galloway Council

Kirkbank

English Street

Dumfries

DG1 2HS

 

 Objections must be submitted by 5pm Thursday 28th November 2013 

 

If you object via email or letter and receive one of the objection cards through your letterbox, please pass the card onto someone you think may be prepared to object.

 

Thank you!

 

Please note: It is better to rewrite the objection in your own words but we know people don’t always have time.  Every objection submitted is important

 

If more than one person from your household wants to object please send the objection in from each separate person.  One objection signed by more than one person still only counts as one!

 

Remember to include your name, address and date for validity (posted objections must also be signed)

 

Email to

PlanningRepresentations@dumgal.gov.uk

 

Post to 

Head of Planning and Building Standards

Dumfries and Galloway Council

Kirkbank

English Street

Dumfries

DG1 2HS

 

 Objections must be submitted by 5pm Thursday 28th November 2013 

 

If you object by email or letter and have also received one of the objection cards through your letterbox, please pass the card onto someone you think may be prepared to object.

 

Thank you!

 

[please copy the text below the line or view as PDF or downlaod as a Word file]

CLICK HERE to see the specimen objection letter as a pdf document (best for copying)

CLICK HERE to download the letter as a Word document

 


 

[your address]

 

 

[date]

 

 

Head of Planning and Building Standards

Dumfries and Galloway Council

Kirkbank

English Street

Dumfries

DG1 2HS

 

 

Dear Planning Officer,

 

Planning Application    13/P/2/0284

Erection of 7 x 132m wind turbines and associated infrastructure at Knockendurrick, Irelandton, Twynholm

 

 

I object to this application on the following grounds:-

 

  • Approval of this scheme would set a precedent and open the area to further large scale turbines.

 

  • The proposed size of turbine is contrary to the detailed guidance in the Dumfries and Galloway Wind Farm Landscape Capacity Study which concludes “There is no scope for siting the large typology within this landscape due to the scale of these foothills and their likely prominence from adjacent sensitive landscapes.”

 

  • The height of these turbines will diminish the scale of the landmark hills of Knockendurrick, Cairntosh, Fuffock and Bengray. Scottish Natural Heritage advises turbines should not be more than one third of the height of key landscape features.

 

  • The predicted significant adverse impact on approximately one fifth of the Fleet Valley National Scenic Area is unacceptable and I disagree with the applicant’s conclusion that (6.318 Environmental Statement) “This leads to the conclusion that the effects would not be significant overall.”   Turbines would be highly visible from Vennie Hill, Rutherford’s Monument, Cardoness Castle, Mossyard  and around Sandgreen

 

  • The development will have a wide visual impact affecting parts of Kirkcudbright, Twynholm, Gatehouse of Fleet, Borgue and Ringford (including Neilson’s Monument at Barstobrick) as well as more distant settlements and visitors driving in and around the National and Regional Scenic Areas.

 

  • There are over 30 properties within 2km and 15 properties will suffer significant adverse visual effects (ref Appendix 6.7).  Local people face a potential reduction in their quality of life, property values and tourism businesses.  Emerging evidence indicates that wind turbines can impact indirectly on health due to disrupted sleep, stress and annoyance from noise.  These effects can then cause problems such as loss of concentration and cardiovascular problems.

 

 

This proposal breaches SPP 127, 187 and local policies S21, E3, E6, GP7, GP24, D36 and the IPP.

 

I do not believe the benefits of this development will outweigh the negative impacts and hope you refuse this application.

 

Yours faithfully,

 

[your signature if sending by post]

 

[your name]

 

CLICK HERE to see the specimen objection letter as a pdf document (best for copying)

CLICK HERE to download the letter as a Word document

 

This article was published in the Scotsman on Monday 14th October 2013. It serves as a useful resume of how our energy policy has become such a costly [omni]shambles. We have reproduced it here in full and you can see the opriginal here. The author is Bill Jamieson who describes himself:

 

"founder & editor Scot-Buzz, the website for business. Former Execitive Editor The Scotsman."

 


 

 

If it is set to be a cold comfort winter for households as domestic energy bills are hiked, the political temperature is heading in the opposite direction: an explosive boiling point.

 

The truth of UK energy policy has been lost in a maze of subsidies, charges, floor prices and renewables targeting that has led to relentless price increases.

 

The latest 8.2 per cent rise announced by SSE will almost certainly be followed by the other energy suppliers and will raise the average domestic dual fuel energy bill by £106 to £1,380.

 

It is, said one industry expert, “the final nail in the coffin for affordable energy”. But it is only a wonder how it has taken so long for this nail to strike home.

 

Last week’s announcement may have given the impression of hapless energy companies struggling against the impersonal forces of world energy markets. But this is a crisis largely created by successive UK governments. I am grateful to leading energy expert Tony Lodge for an analysis published by the Centre for Policy Studies. Not everyone will go along with some of his radical suggestions, but his account is a useful aide-mémoire of how we got here.

 

Back at a meeting of the European Union Council in 2007, Tony Blair committed the UK to have 15 per cent of our total energy derived from renewables. The level at the time was just 1.2 per cent. No economic impact assessment was put before the prime minister, or indeed commissioned, though in fairness such an exercise could only have been speculative guesswork.

This ambitious target was dwarfed by the commitment to source 35 per cent of electricity from renewables by 2020. Given the tide of political enthusiasm for green energy at the time, when the PM’s finger pointed at the moon, who dared to examine the finger?

 

Last year renewables, including biomass, provided less than 11 per cent of UK electricity, against coal and gas combined at 70 per cent. So the huge switchover inevitably involved substantial costs and sharply higher bills both for business and household consumers. But there was another problem: decommissioning of existing coal-fired plants could land the UK with a crisis of supply. National Grid recently warned again about blackouts and price spikes.

 

The 2007 commitment was followed in 2008 by the Climate Change Act setting a legally binding framework for a 34 per cent cut in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020. Alongside this was a commitment to close 12 gigawatts of coal and oil power plants by 2015 to meet EU emissions rules. The coalition went along with this and the Scottish Government embellished it. However, new gas plants remain unbuilt.

 

Further intervention brought a new UK price for carbon emissions from power plants, much higher than in the rest of Europe. It was supposed to encourage the building of low-carbon power plants. Instead it resulted in higher prices being slapped on coal and gas plants, pushing up consumers’ bills. The UK carbon tax is expected to add about £1 billion a year to renewables subsidies in 2017.

Meanwhile, a new Emissions Performance Standard will be introduced to ban new coal plants, irrespective of the coal price being low, largely as a result of the US shale boom.

 

Contrast all this with Holland and Germany, where new coal plants are being completed, with more planned. These efficient plants will be able to take advantage of record low coal prices.

 

Lodge says: “We must drop the pretence that the UK enjoys an electricity market – it doesn’t. Instead it has created, through decarbonisation targets, a heavily interventionist and subsidy-drunk sector which is highly regulated.”

 

Among his recommendations are that we should stop building wind turbines (“expensive and do not provide electricity on a viable, reliable or economic scale”); amend the Emission Performance Standard so that new modern coal power plants can be built; stop subsidising solar and re-examine subsidies for biomass wood imports; develop a shale industry; continue to improve energy efficiency and drop the carbon price floor which has been raising electricity bills.

 

The 2007 Blair pre-crash draconian targets should be dropped. They were “ill-founded and unworkable and the UK should no longer be bound by them”.

 

Finally, he urges that “we should cut the ‘greenwash’ and lies about green jobs. Redundant shipyards and factories across northern England and Scotland were promised a bounty of marine and wind-related manufacturing work generating tens of thousands of jobs. It wasn’t and isn’t true.”

 

And if this is not enough to concentrate minds, perhaps this might help: renewable subsidies look set to rise from just under £2bn this year to more than £5bn by 2018-19. Onshore wind will receive a guaranteed electricity price double the typical wholesale price and offshore wind will receive triple the typical wholesale price.

 

Renewable energy subsidies have failed to deliver reductions in cost. Government policy was supposed to reduce costs by creating economies of scale and driving technological innovation, but renewable energy still requires very similar levels of subsidy.

 

Despite this, the Committee on Climate Change has warned that “required investment is at risk” unless higher subsidies for offshore wind are provided. Matthew Sinclair, chief executive of the Taxpayers’ Alliance, says: “If the government are serious about easing the pressure on people’s living standards, they need to take action and scrap lavish renewable energy subsidies. And it is a joke for Ed Miliband to pretend he is taking on the Big Six on behalf of consumers, when he is proposing to keep the targets in place.”

His conclusion is hard to dispute. If politicians are serious about helping families struggling with their bills, then they need to do something about their “dysfunctional and painfully expensive energy policies”.

 

Amen to that.

 

Twitter: @Bill_Jamieson

 

 

3 x 100m turbines at Chapman's Howe Wind Farm

at

Hartburn Farm, Kirkcudbright

 

Please, we need as many genuine objections as possible as we are aware that there is a support 'campaign' ongoing.  Please pass this on to as many people as you can and show the developers and our councillors that we care about the landscape of D & G.

 

CH_panorama_1_600px

Proposed 3 x 100m turbines near Hartburn Farm, Kirkcudbright

Click on the photo to see a larger image.

 

The 2 x 20m turbines on site will be removed if Chapman's Howe is approved.  They are barely visible to the left but show the difference in size!  This is an approximation of what the development will look like.

 

The site lies off the B727 (National Cycle Route 7) which is the Gelston to Kirkcudbright road, between Nether Linkins and Whinnieliggate and is adjacent to the proposed Barcloy Hill development.

 

The site is not ‘up in the hills’ and away from people as there are 26 properties within 2km.

 

The development would be located in a very complex landscape which is unique in Dumfries and Galloway.  On the cusp of coastal granite uplands and peninsula landscape character types, turbines of this height would dominate the iconic ridgeline of Screel, Bengairn/Barcloy contravening local policy.

 

Dumfries & Galloway Council's responsibility is to ensure a balance between turbine development and the amenity value of local landscapes. These landscape types have been assessed for local Council policy as NOT being suitable for turbines over 50 – 55m to tip.  If these turbines (or any turbines over 55m) are approved it will set a precedent for this area.  This would render the council’s latest planning policy ineffective for any other turbine developments  – wasting a great deal of public money. More importantly there would be no effective means of protecting valuable local landscapes against the industrialising effects of very big turbine development.

 

 

Barcloy Ridge

 

The Barcloy Ridge – photo taken from B727 near Sypland.  Note the 80m mast to the right that towers above the Barcloy ridge line.  The foreground is the Chapman's Howe site and the turbines would be approximately the same tip height as the mast tip!

Barcloy mast


TW312 firmly believes that this development is inappropriate for the location and is contrary to Council poilcy.


 

Below are 2 specimen objection letters that you may copy and paste into your own document

 

It is better to rewrite the objection in your own words but we know people don’t always have time.  Every objection submitted is important.

 

If more than one person from your household wants to object please send an objection in from each person.  One objection letter signed by several people still only counts as a single objection!

 

Remember to include your name, address and date for validity (posted objections must also be signed)

Email to: PlanningRepresentations@dumgal.gov.uk

 

Or post to:       

Head of Planning and Building Standards

Dumfries and Galloway Council

Kirkbank

English Street

Dumfries

DG1 2HS

 

Objections must be submitted by 5pm Thursday 15th August 2013

 

If you object via email or letter and don't intend to use  one of the objection cards received through your letterbox, please pass the card onto someone you think may be prepared to object.

 

Thank you!

 


[version1]

 

[Address]

 

[Date]

 

Head of Planning and Building Standards

Dumfries and Galloway Council

Kirkbank

English Street

Dumfries

DG1 2HS

 

Dear Planning Officer,

 

Planning Application    13/P/2/0189

Erection of 3 x 100m wind turbines and associated infrastructure

at Chapman's Howe, Hartburn Farm, Kirkcudbright

 

I object to this application on the following grounds:-

 

Approval of this scheme would set a precedent and open the area to further large scale turbines.

 

The proposed size of turbine is contrary to the guidance detailed in the Dumfries and Galloway Wind Farm Landscape Capacity Study, which identifies turbines of 50-55m to tip as being more appropriate for this site.

 

The height of these turbines will diminish the scale of the landmark hills and ridge line of Screel, Bengairn and Barcloy. Scottish Natural Heritage advises turbines should not be more than one third of the height of key landmarks (such as these coastal granite hills).

 

The turbines would be too close to several properties but one in particular will experience an over-bearing presence with all 3 turbines located within 750m.  Local people face a potential adverse impact on their quality of life and property values.  Emerging evidence indicates that wind turbines can impact indirectly on health due to stress and annoyance from noise, which are known to cause problems such as disrupted sleep, tinnitus, loss of concentration and cardiovascular problems.

 

Excessive amounts of construction traffic and abnormal loads will travel through Gelston and along minor roads over a six month period.

 

The site supports a variety of wildlife which could suffer through loss of foraging/disturbance of habitat and many wintering birds pass through the site on their way to and from feeding grounds.

 

There will be a significant adverse impact on the setting of archaeological features such as Kirkbride Settlement and Dungarry Fort.

 

This proposal breaches SPP 127, 187 and local policies S21, E3, E6, GP7, GP24, D36 and the IPP.

 

I do not believe the benefits of this development will outweigh the negative impacts and hope you refuse this application.

 

Yours faithfully,

 

[Name & Signature]

 


[Version 2 – more detailed]

 

[Address]

 

[Date]

 

Head of Planning and Building Standards

Dumfries and Galloway Council

Kirkbank

English Street

Dumfries

DG1 2HS

 

Dear Planning Officer,

 

Planning Application    13/P/2/0189

Erection of 3 x 100m wind turbines and associated infrastructure

at Chapman's Howe, Hartburn Farm, Kirkcudbright

 

I object to this application on the following grounds:-

 

Setting a precedent

 

Approval of this scheme would set a precedent and open the area to further large scale turbines which would prove difficult to stop.  SNH have raised concerns in their scoping response for the adjacent Barcloy Hill “that permitting the use of large turbines in this location would set a precedent for their widespread use in this area”.

 

Size of turbines

 

The site sits on the boundaries of 2 landscape character types (peninsula and coastal granite uplands).  The Dumfries and Galloway Wind Farm Landscape Capacity Study (LCS) indicates that neither landscape type is suitable for turbines of this size by stating that:-

 

“There is no scope for the larger typologies to be located within the Dundrennan peninsula without significant adverse effects occurring on a number of key sensitivity criteria.”

 

“There is no scope for the large typology to be located within the Bengairn unit of the Coastal Granite Uplands without significant adverse effects occurring across a wide range of sensitivities.”

 

The Landscape Capacity Study classification for Coastal Granite Uplands, identifies turbines at the lower end of medium typology (50-55m to tip) as being more appropriate for this site.

 

“Scale and openness:-   there may be some limited opportunity to locate turbines towards the lower height band of this typology (and limited numbers of turbines) to avoid dominating the vertical scale of key hills.”

 

“Landform and shape:-   There may be some limited scope to locate lower (height) turbines on slacker lower hill slopes and less complex undulating moorland in the north-west and west of this unit to minimise effects on adjacent more dramatic rugged hills”.

 

“Landscape context:-   there may be some increased scope to locate turbines towards the lower height band of this typology in areas where the landmark hills are less pronounced”

 

"Landscape values:-   This typology may also affect the setting of the landmark hills if located in undesignated parts of this landscape unit of the Coastal Granite Uplands."

 

However, the applicant fails to make a convincing case that the locality is appropriate for 100m turbines to tip.  They completely fail to address the issue of the scale of the turbines in relation to the height of the landmark hills of Bengairn, Barcloy and Suie Hill.

 

Guidance from SNH 2009, states that wind farms of good design are typically “Of minor vertical scale in relation to the key features of the landscape (typically less than one third)”

 

This proposal is for  turbines to be  sited approximately 135m below the Barcloy ridgeline. SNH's guidance (above) would mean limiting the height of  turbines to no more than 50m.  This guidance backs the advice in the LCS, which is further supported by the fact that, to date, there are no approved turbines over 55m in the area with several proposals ranging from 74m to 130m being refused by the council and/or the Scottish Government.

 

Turbines of 100m to tip will have the effect of diminishing the scale of this iconic ridge and in many views the turbines will be visible on the skyline.  Views to and from these hills will be disrupted by the moving blades.

 

The landscape around the site is unique and complex and the introduction of large industrial generators will detract from these rare, special qualities as they would appear out of scale with the surrounding landscape and the small landscape features of gorse, hedgerows and mature trees. The applicant tries to down-grade the landscape sensitivity of the site and this tactic should not be entertained.

 

 

Impacts on National Scenic Area (NSA) and Regional Scenic Area (RSA)

 

There is a tendency for wind developers to devalue the inland setting of the coastal granite uplands.  The Screel/Bengairn/Barcloy ridge performs an important function as the background setting for Castle Douglas and for views across the wider area.

 

The LCS identifies that uninterrupted views to and from Bengairn are important.  This does not only mean out to the coastal views but as a 360 ° experience.  The piecemeal erosion of parts of the NSA and RSA should not be tolerated.  At just over 3km distance from Bengairn these turbines will introduce large, vertical, moving, man made structures which will detract significantly from the vistas.

 

The RSA is just 400m away and actually extends towards the site beyond the NSA boundary.  This whole area is worthy of National Park status and the small scale of our NSA’s and RSA’s should be fiercely protected.

 

 

Impacts on Residential Amenity

       

The turbines would be far too close to nearby properties with all 3 turbines ranging from approximately 650 – 750m for one property.  This would have an overbearing effect on the residents.  Local people face a reduction in their quality of life and property values due to significant visual impact and/or noise.

 

The developer gives assurances that the permitted noise levels will be met but adhering to these levels does not guarantee that local people won’t suffer noise problems.  Guidance (ETSU-R-97) was written in 1996 at a time when turbines were half the height planned for Chapman’s Howe and is considered by many acousticians to be outdated and unfit for purpose.

 

If Barcloy Hill is approved, the applicant requests that the permitted noise levels be raised from 35 dB during the daytime to 37.5dB.  This should not be allowed – it is evident that trying to cram too many turbines in-between properties is an identied problem so why should local residents suffer higher noise levels?

 

Emerging evidence indicates that wind turbines can impact indirectly on health due to stress and annoyance, which are known to cause problems such as disrupted sleep, tinnitus, loss of concentration and cardiovascular problems.

 

In view of this, the ‘Precautionary Principle’ should be invoked and setback distances of 2km enforced between properties and turbines.

 

 

Other issues

 

Excessive amounts of construction traffic and abnormal loads will travel through Gelston and along minor roads over a six month period.  Local property owners are concerned about structural damage heavy traffic could cause to their roadside dwellings

 

The site supports a variety of wildlife which could suffer through loss of foraging/disturbance of habitat and many wintering birds pass through the site on their way to and from feeding grounds.  The numbers of over-wintering birds quoted are low compared to the numbers witnessed by locals in the area.  One of the problems with the bird surveys is that the bird surveyors do not attain a true picture of the large numbers of over-wintering birds that fly over the site on days when they are not present.

 

There will be a significant adverse impact on the setting of archaeological features such as Kirkbride Settlement and Dungarry Fort.

 

The Chapman's Howe Wind Farm would in effect be adjacent to the Barcloy Hill 5 x 115 metre wind turbine development for which the application has been submitted but not yet decided.  If Barcloy were consented, this development would have a cumulative negative impact due to the differing heights of turbines and rotational speeds of the blades which would make for a confusing picture and would ‘clutter’ the locality.  The impact on the landscape character would be significant and adverse and the requested increase in permitted noise levels to 37.5dB should not be allowed for what in effect would be an 8 turbine wind farm.

 

The applicant admits in their application that this development will bring little economic benefit to the area, however, it will have long term economic consequences for households as the ‘subsidies’ gained by the development are levied via consumers’ electricity bills for the 25-year operational life of the wind farm.

 

This proposal breaches SPP 127, 187 and local policies S21, E3, E6, GP7, GP24, D36 and the IPP

 

I do not believe the benefits of this development will outweigh the negative impacts and urge you you refuse this application.

 

Yours faithfully,

 

[Name & Signature]

 

 

After three and a half years fighting this proposal, TW312 are delighted to announce that the Reporter appointed by the Scottish Government has refused the appeal.

 

Landscape visual impact and the overbearing impact on 2 properties are citied

 

Click here to read report

 

Scroll down to 5th June – Appeal decision document

 

The Reporter has recognised the importance of the Interim Planning Policy (IPP) and the Dumfries and Galloway Landscape Capacity Study (DGWLCS) which contains the details of landscape character types and their ability to accommodate a size of turbine in a particular location.

 

 

 

Some quotes from the report:-

 

I agree with the conclusions of the council’s landscape capacity study (DGWLCS) that there would be significant adverse effects from large turbines occurring across a wide range of sensitivities within the drumlin pastures and coastal granite uplands. From the evidence of my site inspection, I also agree with the advice of Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) that the drumlin pastures and coastal uplands have a higher sensitivity than ‘medium’ to large (typology) turbines as suggested in the appellant’s Environmental Statement.

 

I find the whole landscape envelope, running north-east to south-west from Castle Douglas to Kirkcudbright and incorporating small settlements and their agricultural hinterlands, would be unable to accommodate 6 wind turbines of the size and scale proposed by the appellant.  I consider the proposed turbines, 130 metres in height to blade tip, would the area’s small scale land use pattern and gentle rounded topography.

 

I find that the turbines would be visually dominant when viewed from the north against the rising backdrop of the granite uplands (Screel, Bengairn, Barcloy) and the jagged hill tops beyond. The peaks and hills are also important recreational assets and I consider their attractiveness would be diminished by the presence of a cluster of large turbines in such close proximity.

 

In summary, for the reasons set out in paragraphs 9 to 15 above, I consider that the proposal does not accord with the requirements of structure plan policies S21 and E3 and interim planning policy (IPP) WEP3 because it would result in a significant adverse impact on the character, appearance and visual amenity of the local landscape and area. The turbines would also have a significant adverse visual impact on occupiers of the two closest residential properties.

 

A huge thank you to everyone who has supported us over this time and/or has submitted objections

BARCLOY HILL

 

RES announced a new project manager for the Barcloy Hill Wind Farm at the Kirkcudbright Community Council meeting last week.  When asked how the scheme conformed to local policy they admitted it didin't but said they hoped it would be pushed through anyway!

 

RES stated that the decision date for Barcloy was the 24th April (unless RES and the council agree an extension) and there is a Planning Application Committee meeting due that day.  We will let you know as soon as we hear if Barcloy is on the agenda.

 

Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) are not able to object to wind farms anymore but have submitted clear guidance that the Barcloy turbines are too big for the landscape and will have significant adverse impacts on the area.

 

MAYFIELD

 

Community Windpower Ltd have until the 18th March to appeal against the councils refusal of the Mayfield application.  It could take a few days for the appeal to appear on the Scottish Government website but we should know by the end of next week.

 

IRELANDTON (KNOCKENDURRICK)

 

Banks Renewables will be holding 3 public exhibitions on the Knockendurrick proposal for 10 x 132m turbines

 

Twynholm Village Hall 18th March 3 -7pm

Kirkcudbright Town Hall 19th March  3 – 7pm

Gatehouse Community Centre 21st March 3 – 7pm

 

COLLIESTON HILL

 

The application for an 80m mast has been appealed to the Scottish government due to non-determination within the time frame allowed.  There is a scoping application in for the same site for 18 x 141.4m turbines.

 

OPEN FOR COMMENT (until 28/03/13)

 

13/P/2/0044   High Barcaple   1 x 62m

13/P/2/0050   Larg Farm Creetown 1 X 45.5m

 

PLANNING APPLICATIONS

 

13/P/2/0055   Marnhoul Wood ( E271234, N576145) 1 X 80m Met Mast (Infiergy)

13/P/2/0056   Smittons   E262318, N593717) 1 X 80m Met Mast (Infiergy)

13/P/1/0042   Kirwaugh Farm Wigtown 2 X 28.673m turbines

13/P/1/0105   North Park Farm Kirkcolm 1 X 46.5m turbines

 

SCOPING APPLICATIONS

 

13/E/1/0021   Awkirk Farm Ardwell 1 X 27m turbine

13/E/1/0022   Baltersan Farm Newton Stewart 1 X 45m

13/E/1/0023   Reiffer Park Sorbie Newton Stewart 1 X 67m

 

13/N/1/0002 Shennanton Wind Farm, Kirkcowan 11 X 100m turbines dated 07/03/2013 (submitted by PNE Wind)

13/N/1/0003 Larbrax Wind Farm Nr Stranraer 8 X 125m turbines dated 07/03/2013 (Submitted by PNE Wind)

 

 

Wishing you all a very Merry Christmas!

 

 

…like a gathering army ready to wreak the most toxic disturbance of rural life in Scotland since the Highland Clearances. Unless you follow the micro-practices of Government and Local Authority planning you may well not know what is about to happen to the countryside and community life in Scotland. The map shows existing and proposed turbines in Dumfries and Galloway (special thanks to Keith Mycock for creating and maintaining it).

Map Key:

  • Yellow: 0-20m
  • Green: 20-50m
  • Orange: 50-80m
  • Blue: 80+m

There is no distinction shown between turbines already built and those proposed – unless indicated in the information associated with specific turbine markers.


View Turbines in a larger map

Please note: turbines under 80m and outwith planning area 2 (The Stewartry) are not shown (there are so many – we cannot keep pace). In addition there are a few wind farms not yet included because we are awaiting information about the turbine layout.

Conservation charity, the John Muir Trust, today released the results of a YouGov poll revealing widespread support across Britain, including in Scotland, for prioritising the protection of scenic wild land over large scale wind farms.

 

• 40 per cent of people said the Government should prioritise protecting scenic wild land from large commercial wind farms, even if this means that there is less opportunity to develop wind power in those areas.

 

 

Threat to Tourism

 

• 43 per cent of people in Britain who visit scenic areas in the UK for their natural heritage and beauty would be ‘less likely to visit a scenic area with a large concentration of wind farms’

 

• Just 2 per cent say they would be ‘more likely to visit a scenic area with a large concentration of wind farms’.

 

Read more here

Apologies for not posting last week's planning applications due to internet problems.

 

Planning Applications

 

12/P/2/0293     Torrories Fram, Kirkbean   2 x 20m

Open for comment until 15/11/12

12/P/2/0294     Kenview, Parton     1 x 25.8m

Open for comment until 22/11/12

12/P/2/0296     Little Sypland     1 x 74m

Open for comment until 06/12/12

12/P/2/0298     West Kirkcarswell     1 x 56.3m

12/P/2/0300     Lorg (Ewe hill)     80m met mast

12/P/2/0301     Lorg (Craigstewart)     80m met mast

12/P/2/0302     Benbrack     80m met mast

12/P/2/0305     Benbrack     80m met mast

12/P/2/0309     Nether Ernambrie, Clarebrand     2 x 21.9m

 

Scoping Applications

 

12/E/2//0035    Pibble, Creetown     1 x 56.7m

12/E/2/0037     Baerlochan, Twynholm     1 x 105m

12/E/2/0038     Farhills Farm, Auchencairn     1 x 65m

12/E/2/0039     Larg Farm, Creetown     1 x 45m

 

12/E/1/0062     Gass Farm, Glenluce     19 x 126.5m & 70m mast

 

Withdrawals and Refusals

 

Glenstockdale    2 x 100m     withdrawn

12/P/1/0120     Cairnbowie, Kirkcolm     2 x 45.5m     Refused – Cumulative Impact

09/P/3/0340     Minnygap     Refused

 

The Minnygap proposal for 10 turbines, which has dragged on for years, was soundly rejected by Dumfries and Galloway Council yesterday.  The grounds for refusal include the MoD's objection in relation to Eskdalemuir Siesmic Station, tourism and landscape impact grounds.

 

Last week  E.on announced plans for 3 large wind farms totalling 234MW straddling Dumfries and Galloway and South Ayrshire.

The trio are located at Benbrack, Enoch Hill and Lorg

Click here for more details

 

 

 

 

Alex Salmond has defended onshore windfarms, saying they do not spoil the countryside and actually make Scotland more attractive Read more here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                  The Clyde wind farm photos courtesy of Olive Repton

Russell Brown is the serving MP for Dumfries & Galloway. He is concerend, when it comes to what seeems like the unrestrained multiplication of large wind turbines, that the views of local people are not being taken into account. You can support Russell's stance and sign the petition HERE

 

Please don't forget to vote YES for the What Do You Think? question on the right hand side

 

You may not be concerned about the number of wind turbines visible in D & G at present but less than half of the turbines consented have yet been built  and there are a further 700 turbines within the planning system to be decided and/or submitted.  That's potentially over 1,000 turbines, over 50m+ to tip, across our landscape.

 

D & G have applications for the secong highest number of turbines behind The Highlands – which has at least 4X the land mass of this region!

 

The petition will be delivered to First Minister Alex Salmond.

STOP PRESS

Post Categories

Post Archives