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The A713 Castle Douglas to Ayr road was shut just north of Parton following the incident which occurred at 22.45 on Monday 6th February.

 

A DAF lorry, part of a convoy heading to the Brockloch wind farm at Carsphairn, had left the road.

 

Recovery work took over 3 days during which the road was closed. The road has now reopened after inspections of its condition.

 

Some people might suggest that attempting to take these extremely long vehicles along narrow, winding roads is irresponsible – more, that to do so in darkness looks like negligence.

 

For more on this story folloow this link to BBC News

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An application to develop a wind farm of 10 x 134 metre turbines at Longburn Farm, Stroanfreggan, Carsphairn (on the B729, approximately 7km east of Carsphairn) has been submitted to Dumfries and Galloway Council. There are concerns that this development will straddle the Southern Uplands Way and affect local archeological sites.

 

Further information can be obtained here and by entering this reference into the search box: 16/P/2/0187

 

PLEASE NOTE: we previously published an incorrect deadline date for the submission of comments. The correct deadline is: UP TO 5PM ON 1ST SEPTEMBER.

 

Email    PlanningRepresentations@dumgal.gov.uk

 

Below is a standard objection letter that you may use if you wish to object – please remember to add your address, date and name. You will need to copy and paste the text and send from your own email account.
 

____________________________________

 

Address

Date
 
Reference: 16/P/2/0187

Longburn wind farm, 10 x 134m turbines and associated infrastructure, 7.2km east of Carsphairn.

 
Dear Mr McTeir,
 
I object to the above planning application on the following grounds:-

 
This proposal will have significant adverse landscape and visual impacts.  Views to and from Cairnsmore of Carsphairn should be protected (reference constraint guidance in the Dumfries and GallowayWind Farm Landscape Capacity Study).

 

There are already 214 turbines operational/consented within a 15km radius of the planned site, with a further 215 awaiting decision. There will be a significant adverse cumulative visual impact in the area with existing/planned wind farms.

 

There will be a significant adverse impact on walkers of the Southern Uplands Way as the path goes directly through the site.  The cumulative effect of Longburn and surrounding wind farms will devalue this locality.

There will be a significant adverse impact on black grouse and hen harriers.  The territory of these species is constantly being fragmented making it difficult for their numbers to increase.  According to information submitted by the developer, there is still potential conflict in relation to flight lines for the two species.

 
I hope you reject this application.
 
Yours sincerely,
 
Name

 

 

When we express our opposition to the local siting of large turbines it is not uncommon for pro-wind advocates to trot out the hackneyed accusation of 'NIMBY"!

 

Of course anyone who finds themselves directly affected by wind farm proposals will have done a little more research than most and will know about the invasive effects turbines can have on the health and wellbeing of those living nearby. This is not trivial and neither is it a gentile form of aesthetic 'nimbyism'. The validated evidence of harm is growing – and it is, of course, unlikely that you will hear the Scottish Government, wind farm developers, land owners or even local Environmental Health officers talking about it! (Hmmm – why?)

 

If you are interested or concerned you might like to look at this presentation.

 

Stop These Things have developed this really interesting timeline. It sets out a chronology of what the wind industry knew (and when); what the wind industry did in response to this knowledge and how the wind industry is still manouevering  to ensure that this knowledge is marginalised in the interests of minimising opposition to the proliferation of large turbines. Meanwhile it is increasingly apparent that turbines can have significant, negative effects on the health and well-being of people living next door to wind farms. Click here to see the presentation.

 

So when someone wants to accuse you of being a climate change skeptik, a middle class aesthete, a privileged country dweller or a NIMBY – tell them about the validated harmful effects on people who live near wind farms and who are seen as irritants to be overcome by the Government and the industry.

 

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At the October 14, 2014 Brown County Board of Health meeting, a motion was unanimously approved declaring the Shirley Wind turbines a "Human Health Hazard".  The text of the unanimously approved motion reads:

 

"To declare the Industrial Wind Turbines at Shirley Wind Project in the Town of Glenmore, Brown County, WI. A Human Health Hazard for all people (residents, workers, visitors, and sensitive passersby) who are exposed to Infrasound/Low Frequency Noise and other emissions potentially harmful to human health."

 

Visit BBCRWE wesbite for more info.

Please send any expressions of support and, if applicable, your expereinces to:  BOHsupport@bccrwe.com   

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Proposed 3 x 100m turbines near Hartburn Farm, Kirkcudbright.
Image produced in accordance with guidelines produced by Scottish National Heritage, Spring 2013.
The existing 2 x 20m turbines can be seen to the extreme left of the image and provide a stark contrast to the scale of those proposed.

A further 117 wind turbines and monitoring masts could be on the cards for Galloway if a current wave of applications is passed.

 

The most prominent of these will be 11 turbines at a maximum height of 100m planned for land near the A75 at Shennanton, Kirkcowan, which one council source claimed would leave motorists “practically driving through them”.

 

At next Wednesday’s planning meeting, the council will also be faced with applications for masts at Knockendurrick Hill, Gatehouse, which could result in 10 turbines from Banks Renewables; a mast at Mochrum Fell , Corsock, with a view to 15 turbines from 
Falck Renewables (which has prompted 233 objections), and E.ON has applied for a mast at Benbrack, Carsphairn, with the possibility of erecting 27 turbines.

 

Click here to read more

Ministers from the UK and Ireland are set to sign a deal which will see Ireland buiding 180m (600ft) turines on land with the power being exported across the Irish Sea to Wales.

 

This is supposedly set to save the UK money as onshore wind will prove cheaper than off shore.  Wonder if the transmission losses, impacts of nearby residents health and environmental damage has been included in the costs?

 

Best of all though is the reason for the turbines being so tall:-

 

Because the bog lands are relatively windless, the company behind the scheme says they will need to stretch high into the sky to catch sufficient wind to generate power.

 

Obviously, not the wrong place for a wind development then?

 

To read BBC Report click here

 

 

Credit:     The Galloway Gazette     (20/01/13)

 

"Russell Brown told the Chief Executive of EDF that the peaceful and unique Airriequhillart valley should be left as it is.

 

Mr Brown was speaking during a Question Time-style debate at the Annual General Meeting of the Whithorn Business Association. Speakers from the Conservatives, the SNP and Visit Scotland also took part.

 

EDF, which is planning to build 18 450-foot turbines across the historic Airriequhillart valley, had sent a three-strong team to Whithorn with hopes of persuading the business community to back wind energy. Besides their chief executive, Christian Egal, two more senior executives and a press officer turned up for the session.

 

Mr Egal had been in direct contact with the Airriequhillart Protest Group over several weeks and had been coming under increasing pressure to make a personal visit to the proposed site. As none of the protest group were members, the Business Association decided to allow two of them to attend as guests.

 

Questions included why companies plan to place turbines close to people’s homes, and why no compensation was built into the process for those whose properties were blighted by turbines.

 

There were gasps of disbelief in the crowded room when both EDF and the SNP representative, Aileen Mcleod, argued that the imposition of a turbine site did not affect the value of adjoining properties.

 

Mr Egal argued that there was no evidence that turbine sites affected property prices, despite the fact that compensation schemes are in force in other countries."

 

TW312 comment:-

At the very least, once a turbine site is publicly identified it makes nearby properties more difficult to sell –  there is evidence that the presence of turbines (dependent on proximity and visual impact) can reduce property prices.  Houses have been down graded in council tax-bands by the Valuation Office Agency which provides the Government with valuations and property advice!

 

Credit:     Simon Johnson     Scottish Political Editor     The Telegraph     (13/01/13)

 

"Primary pupils in North Ayrshire were handed plans, seemingly written by a developer, encouraging their parents to back a planning application for an extension to a wind farm in the area.

 

The letter contained a section for parents’ signatures at the bottom and was addressed to the local council’s planning department.

 

Critics yesterday expressed their anger at both the developer and SNP-run North Ayrshire council for allowing wind farm “propaganda” in the classroom but the local authority claimed the letters were “directly relevant” to the pupils’ school work."

 

And the developer is…….. none other than our old friends Community Windpower Ltd!

 

Clcik here to read more

 

Credit:   Jody Harrison     The Herald     (20/12/12)

 

An Edinburgh University study found that onshore wind farms, instead of lasting for 25 years without a drop in input into the grid, are more likely to reach the end of their lifespan in 10 or 12 years.

 

The report, commissioned by the Renewable Energy Foundation, which is against wind farm expansion, raised fears of massive hidden costs within Scotland’s renewables industry.

 

The report by Professor Gordon Hughes could have serious consequences for the Scottish Government’s plans to make Scotland 100% dependent on renewable energy by 2020.

 

The results show the average load factor of wind farms declines substantially as they get older, probably due to wear and tear. By 10 years of age the contribution of an average wind farm to meeting electricity demand has declined by one-third.

 

Click here to read more

Credit:     Simon Johnson     Scottish Political Editor     The Telegraph     (09/11/2012)

 

"A thousand wind turbines are on course to be built in the Scottish Borders thanks to the SNP’s “backroom bullying” of the local council to ignore public opposition, it has been claimed.

 

Campaigners said official figures showed wind farm developers have already built or have planning permission for 403 turbines in the picturesque tourist area.

An additional 418 are in the planning system, either as live applications or appeals, while wind farm companies have started scoping and screening for around a further 200 turbines."

 

Figures for Dumfries and Galloway are now up to over 1,100 for turbines over 50m high at various stages within the planning system

 

 

Alex Salmond has defended onshore windfarms, saying they do not spoil the countryside and actually make Scotland more attractive Read more here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                  The Clyde wind farm photos courtesy of Olive Repton

A community in Canada, who've been trying to publicise the negative effects of wind turbines for many years, have established a new website. You can read real stories from around the world. Click the link below to visit the website:-

 

https://www.illwind.org/index.php/reports

 

We've added this website to the permanent links we maintain on this site (bottom left).

Credit:     Victoria Allen     Scottish Daily Mail     (23/07/12)

 

Scotland is set to become a magnet for wind farm developers, after Alex Salmond yesterday promised to protect their multimillion-pound subsidies from large-scale cuts.

 

It is feared a flood of applications will leave planners north of the Border struggling to cope.

 

Scottish Conservative chief whip John Lamont said: ‘The SNP has to realise that its obsession with wind farms is not shared by the majority of Scottish people.

 

‘There are already far too many applications for wind farms and one thing people and councils do not want to see is an SNP-fuelled surge in such developments.’

 

Linda Holt of Communities Against Turbines Scotland said: ‘Alex Salmond doesn’t just want to see the feeding frenzy for wind developers in Scotland continue, he wants to offer bigger bait than his neighbour so the feeding frenzy becomes even fiercer.

 

Click here to read article

 

An article in The Buteman quotes Conservative MEP Struan Stevenson talking about the potential health impacts from living near wind turbines.  The application discussed is for 3 turbines on the isle of Bute, but it is the first time we have seen/heard politicians start to acknowledge the possible impacts on the health of local residents.

 

“If constructed, the turbines will intrude on many of Bute’s tourist attractions, but the potentially hazardous impacts of the turbines on local residents’ health are most worrying. The health impact of wind farms has recently become a hot topic in the media and independent biomedical experts have shown that living close to a turbine can cause headaches, dizziness, sleep deprivation, unsteadiness, nausea, exhaustion, mood-swings and the inability to concentrate.

 

“The low-frequency noise emitted by a turbine travels easily and varies according to the wind. This constitutes a permanent risk to people exposed to it. There is even military weaponry that relies on low-frequency sound for crowd control purposes.

 

“At high intensities it creates discrepancies in the brain, producing disorientation in the body and resulting in what is called ‘simulated sickness’. The Israeli army uses this technology to cause instability, nausea and headaches. It is great for crowd control as it has no adverse effects…unless you are exposed to it for hours, as you would be if you lived beside a turbine."

 

Keith's letter appeared in the Herald on 5th June 2012

 

Click here to read more

Credit:     George Wood     fifewindfarms.org.uk    

 

Some interesting opinions questioning whether wind turbines do reduce CO2 emissions by George Wood, a former National Grid Power Systems Operations Engineer at both Regional and National Control Centres.

Click here to read article

Credit:     Rowena Mason,    Political Correspondent,     The Telegraph     (15/04/12)

 

Ministers are preparing to veto major new wind farms in the British countryside and cut back their subsidies, according to senior Government sources.

 

The decision to pull back from onshore wind farms comes after more than 100 backbench Conservative MPs mounted a rebellion against turbines blighting rural areas earlier this year.

 

Greg Barker, the Climate Change Minister, also said this weekend Britain has “the wind we need” either being built, developed or in planning.

 

“It’s about being balanced and sensible,” he said. “We inherited a policy from the last government which was unbalanced in favour of onshore wind.  There have been some installations in insensitive or unsuitable locations – too close to houses, or in an area of outstanding natural beauty.”

 

Britain already has around 350 wind farms across the country, with around 500 already under construction or awaiting planning permission

Credit:     BBC News,     South Scotland     (23/03/12)

 

An 18-turbine wind farm in Wigtownshire has been approved by the Scottish government after being rejected by Dumfries and Galloway Council.

 

Developer Gamesa Energy UK appealed against the decision about the scheme at Carscreugh Fell near Glenluce.

 

Councillors refused the bid last April due to concerns about its landscape, visual and archaeological impact.

 

A reporter to Scottish ministers has now ruled the proposals can proceed with a string of conditions.

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